Tag Archives: Runners

Best Headphones For Running

The number quality of a good headphone for running is comfort. Runners take this for granted until they get an uncomfortable pair of headphones. Then they see the truth that ear comfort is absolutely important in headphones when out running or just jogging.

Some Of Popular headphones for running / Jogging

A lot of runners gravitate towards over-the-ear style headphones like the UltraFit collection from Polk Audio (Starting at $40; Yahoo! Shopping) and Yurbuds’s Ironman Endure ($29.99, yurbud.com). This style helps keep the ear buds in place.

The Sennheiser sport neckband headphones ($59.99, sennheiserusa.com) received rave reviews on fit, durability and ease of wear on a few running discussion forums I occasionally read for advice.

Running Headphones are best placed over your ears

Avoid the type of headphones where you insert a little plug in your ears. Unless you get them tailor made specifically for your ear, these are extremely unhealthy and will probably give you ear cancer. A good brand are the flat, blinged-out jazz buds earbuds (meaning they are placed over, not in, the ear canal) from BodyRock Sport ($16, bodyrocksport.com).

Important traits to look for in comfy headphones.

  • The “size” should be adjustable, usually by pulling down on the ear pieces.
  • The headphones should be light weight.

Heel Injuries From Running

Heel injuries from running are quite a common issue for runners, both for newcomers and experienced runners. The reason heel injuries from running are common is because your heels take the initial shock when you land on your feet, each and every time.

Types of Heel injuries from running

Heel Spurs – The pain is felt at the front part of your heel, where the arch and the heel meet.

Plantar Fasciitis – The pain is felt at the center of the heel. To diagnose plantr fasciitis press really hard with your thumb on the center of the heel. If the pain is felt at the center, it is indeed plantar fasciitis.

Heel injury picture : Heel injury photo

Pain In The Bottom and The Back of Your Heel

If you are out running and you feel pain in the bottom and the back of your heel you don’t worry because it might just be nothing serious. Heel pain is quite a common issue for runners, both for newcomers and experienced runners.

Cause of Heel pain

Heel pain is due to the fact your heels take the initial shock when you land on your feet, each and every time. Heel pain could be a sign of heel injuries from running or it could just be a your heel is feeling the intensity of running.

If the heel pain disappears after running and you can walk without any problems it is probably nothing. If you often feel this kind of heel pain while running make sure to ice the heel immeditely after running, get sufficient rest after running and get regular heel massage.

But if you feel pain and limp after you stop running then you are suffering from a heel injury. If you suspect your case is serious read the post on Heel Injuries from running.

Heel Pain When Running : Cause & Treatment

Heel pain when running is a common running injury, especially common with runners who run down hills.

Cause of Heel Pain injury

Heel injury happens when running down hills. When running down hill the foot lands on the heel. This makes the heel to come under extreme pressure and stress. When stress is too much the heel eventually suffers a painful injury. It could be a stress fracture or other tissue injury.

Another cause of heel pain injury is running on over used running shoes. When the sole of the shoe is worn out, the heel gets less support. The lesser the support the higher the risk of heel injury and other foot injuries.

Treatment of Heel Pain Injury

Mild heel injury can heal on their own. The first line of treatment is to stop running and rest the heel. The heel should be iced at least 78 hours after running.

Serious heel pain injury are best treated by a physician. In severe cases the heel may need to be supported with a bandage.

Running Foot Injury Top of Foot

If you experience a running foot injury top of foot when running you are probably suffering from a stress fracture.

Running foot injury top of foot

What many runners report as a running foot injury at the top of foot is medically known as stress structure. Stress fractures are partial breaks or cracks in the bones around the foot.

Cause of Running foot injury top of foot

Stress fractures are caused by extreme stress to the bone. It could be caused by: –

  1. Running too much (over training)
  2. Running on rough, rocky surfaces
  3. Running on a hard surface
  4. Sudden switch from soft surface to hard surface.
  5. Use of worn out running shoes
  6. Running without wearing socks

Treatment of Running Foot Injury ( Stress Fracture)

Stress fractures usually heal on their own. The best treatment is taking a complete REST from running. Although most website say you should take six weeks break from running, I think you should give your foot as much rest as necessary to heal.

When you feel you are ready to return to running, get back slowly. start running on soft surfaces (grass) before running on hard surface.

If the pain is chronic, the foot is swollen and the pain is not going away, see a sports-oriented doctor for a bone scan.

Running Foot Injury : Cause and Treatment

If you are experiencing pain around parts of your foot while running and when you touch and press the parts they feel sore, you are suffering from a stress fracture.

About Stress Fracture

What many runners report as a running foot injury is medically known as stress structure. Stress fractures are partial breaks or cracks in the bones around the foot.

Cause of running foot injury (stress fracture)

Stress fractures are caused by extreme stress to the bone. It could be caused by: –

  1. Running too much (over training)
  2. Running on rough, rocky surfaces
  3. Running on a hard surface
  4. Sudden switch from soft surface to hard surface.

Treatment of Running Foot Injury ( Stress Fracture)

Stress fractures usually heal on their own. The best treatment is taking a complete REST from running. Although most website say you should take six weeks break from running, I think you should give your foot as much rest as necessary to heal.

When you feel you are ready to return to running, get back slowly. start running on soft surfaces (grass) before running on hard surface.

If the pain is chronic, the foot is swollen and the pain is not going away, see a sports-oriented doctor for a bone scan.

Boston Marathon Training Diet & Nutrition

Boston Marathon is known for being a tough race. So what type of diet is best suited for runners training for Boston marathon?

In a series of 2011 boston marathon group winners, Running Times magazine asked the group winners various question but one question caught my interest :-

What kind of pre-race and mid-race nutrition plan did you follow?

The best answer was from, Rami Bardeesy, 42, from Canada whon finished in 2:32:19.

I took in a slight increase in protein-rich foods during the last three weeks and a minor decrease in total calories in proportion to reduced running volume. Pre-race day consists of normal breakfast, followed by a massive carbo-load mid-day (~450g of carbs: maltodextrin, bagels, M&M’s, pretzels, hydrate, hydrate, hydrate) then light pasta dinner. On race day, I had a breakfast of coffee, juice, a bagel, a banana and more coffee, and then stayed hydrated until the race. On the run, I consumed a chocolate GU and water at miles 9, 15, 19 and 21 and some Gatorade every mile other than 1, 9, 15, 19, 21 and 25.

Half Marathon Training Iphone Apps

If you cant get a half marathon training coach you can rely of an Iphone Apps to work as your virtual coach. Two Half marathon training Iphone Apps that work as your virtual coach are Half Marathon training App by Deltaworks and popular walkjogrun App.

Half Marathon Training Iphone App by Deltaworks

The App has a 12 weeks half marathon training plan. Workout 6 days per week, Each plan includes detailed training steps,Different tags mark different plan statuses.

Walkjogrun half marathon training Iphone App

The  walkjogrun App has a 14 week half marathon training schedule. It has plans for different class of runners, beginners, moderate and experienced runners. If you dont exercise it has a plan on how to train to walk the distance.

The half marathon training App was created by Coach Jenny Hadfield, columnist with RunnersWorld.com and Women’s Running Magazine.

How To Set Realistic Running Goals

One reason why many aspiring runners never actualise their running goals is they set themselves unrealistic running goals. Saying I want to finish a 42K marathon in under 3 hours when you have never finished a marathon before is setting yourself up for disappointment.

Set small goals that are concrete, attainable, realistic.

Decide to go three miles, regardless how many times you walk, how many you run. Or go out for 15 minutes. Or set one lap around the block as your starting goal.

Set a Time Limit

Set dates for achieving your running goals. Do your first 5K in six months; your first marathon next year. This will prevent you from the curse of procrastination.

Set an Incentive

Make running a means to a higher purpose. Is it losing weight? Fitting into your wedding dress? Running a Full Under 4 hours? Set a goal, and suddenly you have incentive.

Now got out and run!

Paula Radcliffe Bitten By Dog While Running

The BBC Reported last week that British athlete Paula Radcliffe was bitten by a dog during a training run in Monaco. The 37-year-old world marathon record holder required hospital treatment because of the damage to her calf.

Every runner has a Dog story, it is like Dogs love having a go at runners.

How to Deal With Dogs When They Chase You While Running

  1. Stare down at the dog before he really starts making his move, even if you have to slow down and/or walk backwards.
  2. Make an effort to move away from his turf or his owner so that he doesn’t feel as threatened while you are asserting your dominance, which is what you are doing in step number 1. Move slowly; you want to discourage the dog from chasing you, and not give it a new game.
  3. Talk to the dog and try to calm it down. I will usually say, “Good puppy” or something like that in a soothing voice to try to calm the dog down and show that I am not a threat. It probably helps that I have a deep voice.
  4. If he makes a break for you, stop and bring your hands, arms and legs in towards your body. If you are a man, put your hands in front of your crotch so that the dog can not bite you there. You want your body to be in a straight line so that there is nothing hanging off of you for the dog to attack and grab hold of. Many dogs are just friendly want to play with you or check you out; I don’t assume that the dog going to bite me until it does, but I also do not want to make it easier for the dog to injure me.
  5. If you are bit by the dog, kick it in the head. If you can, try to kick it below its muzzle on its chin as that will cause the most pain while being the least likely to permanently injure the dog. The goal is to give it one good lick that will teach it not to bite runners in the future and hopefully confusing or hurting it enough to leave you alone in the present. Get away from the dog, and call the game warden or your local sheriff at the first possible convenience.
  6. Start moving away or continue your run depending upon whether the dog just wants to sniff you or is being playful or is still threatening to bite. Unless you were bit, do not move too fast until there is some distance between you and the dog. You can probably out run a dog over the long haul, but in a sprint you are all too likely to lose.

Dog Dealing tips courtesy of run to win.