Category Archives: Running Tips

Galen Rupp Training Tips & Secret

I was impressed by performance of Galen Rupp at 2012 London Olympics. It was not the silver medal that he won that caught my eye but that final dash he pulled to storm past the Kenyans and Ethiopians. My first reaction was,”this was his lucky day” but when I checked him up online I realised this was not just luck but a product of excellent training.

Galen Rupp Talking to Running Times Magazine about his 2012 Olympics prospects,

In 2012 July Issue of Running Times this was what the guy said.

“My 26.48 AR put me at number 16 on the world list. I’ve proven that I’m in the mix with guys like Bekele. Now it’s all about putting together the 54-second last lap I’m going to need to make the medal platform. Finishing fifth or sixth isn’t going to satisfy me. We’re after something bigger.”

Talk of confidence!!!

Two people have shaped this guy, Alberto Salazar and Mo Farah. Salazar is his running coach while Mo Farah is his training partner. Salazar has been coaching Rupp for nearly a decade and is the mastermind of his training program.

Training For the Olympics

Sports Illustrated had a training program on how Rupp and Mo Farah prepared for 2012 summer games.

On one day in France, roughly two weeks out from the 10k final, they did six 1,000-meter repeats at an average of 2:38 with just a 500-meter jog between repetitions, and then tacked on three 400-meter sprints in 52 seconds each, a workout made much more taxing by the thin air. Six days before the Games, they did an inverted ladder of three 600-meter sprints in an average of 1:36, 400 meters in 61 seconds, 300 meters in 44 seconds, 200 meters in 27 seconds and then a blazing 300 in 37 seconds flat, followed at the very end by an all-out 400 in 51 seconds. Just before leaving for London, Rupp ran a 100-meter sprint with a two-step running start in 11.03 seconds, his fastest ever. They were ready.

Salazar has also worked on the mental side of things. He has drilled into his head the importance of self belief. “You just believe when it gets to the end, whether it’s a fast race or a slow race, you’re going to outkick them. If you develop yourself to that point, the race becomes very simple. You don’t really even have to look at the clock.”

Having a Training Partner helps.

When Salazar brought Farah into their training group at the Nike Oregon Project in the winter of 2011, Rupp was sceptical. Trust me, Salazar said. Farah would be a good friend and a necessarily challenging partner. They would make each other better runners. Rupp came to see that Salazar was right.

This is what Rupp said immediately after winning silver at 2012 London Games “I’ve been able to train with the greatest distance runner in the world,” Rupp said afterward. “He’s been an unbelievable mentor to me.”

How To Stick To Your Marathon Running Goals This Year

Many people make running resolutions at the beginning of the year but few keep them. At the end of the year people come up with many excuses as to why they did not actualize their goals. The following is a ten point plan that will help you accomplish your running goal this year. The plan will work for anyone dreaming to run a 5K, 10K, half marathon or even the full marathon.

How To Accomplish Your Running Goal.

1. Define and describe your Running goal. Write down when you want to achieve it. Write down the reasons why you want it. Write down what it would feel like after you have achieved it. Figure out exactly what it will take to get it. Be realistic about the time things will take. Many people don’t allow themselves enough time, and give up too soon.

2. Start working toward your running goals tomorrow morning. Don’t wait for June so that you can start your training. Start tomorrow morning! By starting early you get into the habit of running. If you wait until June, you will find another excuse why you should wait until August.

3. Set a realistic Running goal. It is pointless to aim to run your first marathon when you have never even finished a local 10K race. If you have never ran before, start by entering a local 5K race. If you aim too high, you set yourself up for failure.

4. Ask for guidance. No one can tell you exactly what you should do to achieve your goal, but one of the best sources for guidelines is to ask fellow runners. Join running forums, join a local running club, something better is subscribe to a running magazine. Learn from the experience of other runners.

5. Be passionate about running. Striving toward a goal without passion is like a fire which slowly runs out of fuel to burn. Get excited about running; this will mean that you will love what you are doing.

6. Persevere with injuries. Running injuries are part and parcel of running. Don’t let injuries knock you down. When you get injuries take a break and allow your body to rest and heal.

7. Don’t share your running goals with people who might wear you down. Some people are haters by nature. They don’t want to see others get fitter and healthier and they will try to discourage you. Seek only positive vibes.My High school priest once told me, “Dysfunctional people hate seeing healthy progression of character in others.”

8. Visualize. Close your eyes and imagine yourself crossing the finish line. Can you see the smile on your face? AWESOME!

9. Train, Train, and Train more. The only way to run well is to train hard. Knowing is not enough you have to put it to action. Draw up a training table table detailing down, training days and rest days.

10. Lastly remember this pearl of wisdom before you embark on your running goal –

Make sure, your running / fitness/ work out goal is SMART:

  • Specific
  • Measurable
  • Achievable
  • Realistic
  • Team-oriented
  • Time-related

 Don’t let inactivity keep you from achieving your goals. May this year be your best year!

Tips On Mental Stamina For Running

Running is quite tough mentally. The biggest challenges being boredom, staying motivated and fatigue. Everyone has their own mental ability. While the strong-minded will cope with the boredom and fatigue better, others may need more support.

Mental Stamina To Cope with boredom

In the case of boredom, one idea is to get a running partner or join a running club. A running partner can really help you through the bad patches.

Mental Stamina for Staying Motivated

It can sometimes be hard to get motivated, but if you’ve set realistic, achievable short, medium and long-range goals, that should help.

Mental stamina to cope with fatigue

As for developing mental stamina to cope with fatigue, one idea is to play tricks on your mind. Don’t focus on the finish line instead set small targets. It could be a tree, a hill or any other landmark  on the road. Tell yourself you will have to reach, once you reach that point now focus on the next target. That way you will surely make it to the finish line.

Lastly, the only method that guarantees 100% mental stamina is to keep running. The more you run, the more your mind adjusts to the mental stress of running.

Running Stamina Tips

Running stamina is very important in running. Running stamina is the ability to maintain running without fatigue. The key to building running stamina is making your body strong. It is only when your whole body is strong can you become a better and more efficient runner.

When it comes to running stamina you have to go out there and run, run and run more. Unfortunately, there are no shortcuts to this — it really is a case of getting out there and running as much as possible.

How to Build Running Stamina

In the following video, guys from livestrong.com share running stamina tips that will improve your staying power.

What To Eat Before a Race : Pre race Breakfast Food

This is a running tip for a pre-race breakfast meal.

Eat your regular diet, make sure you are hydrating and eat something small that is carbohydrate-based with some protein before the race. Don’t run on an empty stomach. I have noticed every time I race on an empty stomach I get stomach upsets. But don’t have a buffet breakfast—you’ll end up paying for that.

Good Luck.

Tips to Finishing or Completing a Marathon

The secret to finishing or completing a marathon is mileage. Go out there and clock as many miles or kilometres per week. The mileage should be logged for a continuous period of at least 3 months.

Ask any fast marathoner how much they run and you are sure to get something like, upward of 120 km a week. Some log even more, and I am not talking about elites either, just your average Joe who can run marathons in less than three hours.

Unfortunately, we cannot just adapt that theory and start running 100 plus miles a week. You can start small say 20km then progress from 20km to 35, 50, 60, 70 km etc.

So, if you have been asking how do I complete a marathon? Go out and log those miles!

Best Running Advice For Runners

Looking at an elite athlete running you will be impressed by his/her ability to run at a high speed. They make it seem very easy! They can keep going at a level of effort that seems impossible to maintain.

But is it easy for the elite runners than it is for the regular Joe?

A New York Times article examined this issue and experts interviewed gave running  advise on How to Push Past the Pain, as the Champions Do.

Best Running Advice from the article

Even elite runners feel the pain the secret is that they push through the pain rather than stop or slow down.

On How to deal with pain when running?

  • Focus intensely on your running, don’t let your mind drift away because you start slowing down.
  • Athletes must resist the feeling that they are too tired and have to slow down. Instead, they have to concentrate on increasing the intensity of their effort.

To add my own idea on the subject

Don’t focus on your burning chest instead feel your legs. Every time I find myself slowing down I ask myself how my legs are feeling. Most times the answer is the legs are feeling strong. And I step up a gear.

To Read the full article go to New York Time Fitness Page

How To Improve 5K speed / Time By Jeff Galloway

Jeff Galloway has helped many novice runners, run and finish marathon. (he has helped over 1 million runners according to his site) His secret is simple, you dont need to run the full distance to finish a marathon, you just need to run some parts and walk some parts of the course.

In an article published at active.com, 5 ways to improve your 5K speed. Jeff Galloway dishes some ideas on how you can run faster at this distance.

Jeff Galloway Tips on Speed.

I learn’t the following running tips from coach Jeff Galloway on how to increase speed.

1. Every two weeks increase the distance of your long run.

2. Regularly do some speed works

3. Stay injury free, to run fast you need to stay fit. doing the small stuff such, warm ups, massage and stretching will go a long way in helping you stay injury free.

Demonstration of Perfect Runner’s Foot Strike

The reason why scientist claim running barefoot is better that running on shoes is the foot strike.In bare foot running you land on the front of your feet while running on shoes you land on your heel.

The following images shows the foot strike difference in bare foot running and running in shoes.

Image courtesy of Havard University

The landing on heels is the cause of repetitive stress injuries such as ankle injury, calf injury and Achilles tendinitis.

If you have been looking for the best foot strike or good foot strike to help in your running technique /style just study the above image.

Zola Budd Barefoot Running Technique

If Ethiopias’ Abebe Bikila is the god father of barefoot running(He won 1960 Rome Olympic marathon running barefoot) then South African Zola Budd is the god mother of barefoot running.

South African running sensation Zola Budd was a die hard devotee of the art of running barefoot. Budd trained and raced barefoot.

In 1984 aged 17 she set a New world record in 5000 meters while running barefoot.

Back then running barefoot was seen as a crazy idea but now experts seem to tell us running barefoot is not a crazy idea after all. In fact that is how we should be running.

From Science daily

Scientists have found that those who run barefoot, or in minimal footwear, tend to avoid “heel-striking,” and instead land on the ball of the foot or the middle of the foot. In so doing, these runners use the architecture of the foot and leg and some clever Newtonian physics to avoid hurtful and potentially damaging impacts, equivalent to two to three times body weight, that shod heel-strikers repeatedly experience.